Tag Archives: pie corbett

Suspenseful with a pencil

This short post is the writers’ toolkit that’s been developed for a unit of work on writing suspensefully. The intended effect of this type of writing is to make the reader think that something terrible is going to happen. The aspects of the toolkit are the ways in which other writers have achieved that effect, and these were found by children using different texts, but rephrased by me:

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In order for children to write suspensefully, one of the strategies I’ll use is to get them to internalise this knowledge by practising recalling what it is that effective writers do. I selected sentences from the texts that they analysed to use as cues:

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Frequent, spaced out practice of recalling this writerly knowledge will prime them to make deliberate decisions when they write. They have also saved and innovated ideas from other texts so that at the point of writing, they have much to draw upon.

Related posts:
Knowledge, memory and writing
Tweaking Talk4Writing text maps
Writers’ toolkit – discussion

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Tweaking Talk for Writing Text Maps

One of the staples of Talk for Writing is to help children internalise texts and the language patterns within them in order for them to be able to write effectively. One way of doing this is to get children to use a text map to help them retell a text. In the past, they have looked like this:

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For many children, this worked. Some children, though, were still unable to internalise a text and indeed had difficulty writing one. In order to help these children, a few changes were made to the way that we used text maps. First, we arranged the text into a flow map where each box contained one sentence.

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Children who do not yet have a secure understanding of sentence demarcation can be shown the beginnings and ends of sentences much more clearly when the text map is set out in this way. Also, the punctuation is included in the text map. Second, we split the text up to show a paragraph per page of flipchart paper, for similar reasons as splitting up sentences. Third, we wrote a simplified, shorter text for children working at earlier stages of English.

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These children learned this version, but also used the longer version for work on reading comprehension and language development. A final tweak to text mapping has been using the app Explain Everything to create videos of teachers retelling texts.

Children cannot take working walls home with them to practise for homework, but they can watch the video, pause it at different points and retell the text. Children have also been using the text to practise writing accurately. They watch, pause and then write the text. They can then listen again the sentence they were working on to check the accuracy of their writing.

When children move up year groups, these videos can be looked at again, further embedding children’s banks of internalised texts that they can draw upon to write effectively.

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